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tv   BBC Newsroom Live  BBC News  August 9, 2018 11:00am-1:01pm BST

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this is bbc news. these are the top stories developing at 11:00: the us announces new sanctions against russia following its alleged role in the poisioning of a former spy and his daughter in salisbury. northamptonshire county councillors get ready to vote on drastic cuts to jobs and services to combat a £70 million budget shortfall. also coming up — we're expecting the results of an independent investigation into historic child sex abuse over three decades at two roman catholic boarding schools the pound has fallen further against the dollar this morning over concerns about a no—deal brexit. it follows yesterday's tumble, which saw sterling slip below $1.29 for the first time in almost a year. and the giant's causeway in northern ireland is at the centre of a row over whether tourists are being wrongly charged to see the site good morning.
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welcome to bbc newsroom live. britain has welcomed new us sanctions imposed on russia over the salisbury nerve agent attack on sergei and yulia skripal. the sanctions will come into effect on the 22nd of august — and the us state department says more sanctions will follow within 90 days if russia fails to give assurances it will no longer use chemical weapons. the kremlin has called the move "categorically unacceptable" and claims the sanctions are illegal under international law. our washington correspondent chris buckler reports an attack in the middle of england continues to have consequences for international relationships. and in imposing sanctions,
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america is making clear that it believes russia used the nerve agent novichok in an attempted assassination here on the streets of salisbury. in the aftermath of the poisoning of the former russian double agent, sergei skripal, and his daughter, yulia, the united states was one of many countries that did take action. it expelled dozens of russian diplomats from the us, including many from its embassy in washington. and since then, members of congress have been pushing for the state department to make a definitive statement that russia had broken international law by using a chemical or biological weapon. in making that determination, sanctions are being automatically imposed that will prevent the sale of some electronics and sensitive technologies to russia. that could put a strain on relationships at a time when donald trump appears to be trying to reach out to vladimir putin, particularly as a second wave of harsher sanctions will follow unless moscow gives reassurances that it won't use chemical weapons again and opens up
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some sites to inspectors within 90 days. the kremlin is likely to resist that. it continues to deny that it was involved in the attempted murder of sergei skripal and his daughter. however, the us isjust one of more than 20 countries who've taken formal action against russia, and the british government has welcomed what it called the strong international response. chris buckler, bbc news. i'm joined now by our diplomatic correspondent jonathan marcus. that word, strong, how strong does this look to you? the first wave, not particularly strong. what is fascinating about this is that it shows you the tensions within us foreign policy. on the one hand you have president trump trying to be friendly towards the russians, the summit, where we still don't know precisely what happened in his one—on—one meeting with mr putin,
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his invitation for him to meet him again, the various overtures from senators close to mr trump to the russians. on the other hand, you have congress's role in foreign policy. the sanctions that have come m, policy. the sanctions that have come in, that will be coming in in a few weeks' time, they stem from legislation back in 1991. they have been used in the past against both syria and north korea. essentially, they require automatic sanctions onceit they require automatic sanctions once it is determined that a country has used chemical weapons, in various circumstances, then the sanctions come in. the first wave, asi sanctions come in. the first wave, as i say, will not have a huge impact because many of the technologies that are already covered by the obama era sanctions are denied to the russians. coming down the line, the next phase in 90 days, it has much more draconian steps, potentially even things like cutting off access to russian aircraft, civil aircraft, to the united states and so on. it is a big issue. the russians are very annoyed. it poses huge problems for
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mr trump's effort to pursue a parallel, more friendly approach towards moscow. unsurprisingly, the british government has welcomed this? absolutely, i think britain was delighted by the fact that so many countries, so quickly, backed its view of what happened in salisbury. the british government presented the evidence to them, it obviously called in the international inspectors to take their own samples and verify what their own samples and verify what the british were saying. very quickly, as you say, a number of countries expelled russian diplomats, including the united states, expelling 60. what is fascinating in a way, in a sense, the clocks should have started at that point for the imposition of these new sanctions, it didn't. the administration has been rather tardy in implementing this. some congresspeople have suggested that they needed to back up their act and get moving. it is curious in a way, if they had enacted all of this in a
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timely fashion, it might well have overshadowed and perhaps even prevented the summit between the president and mr putin. the first round of all of this, the effect is less significant, what could be coming down the road in 90 days is much more significant. with me now from russia is our moscow correspondent steve rosenberg. what is being said about this stage? literally in the last few minutes the kremlin has reacted to these new us sanctions. the kremlin is not happy. dmitry peskov, president putin's press secretary, said it was an unfriendly act, and could hardly be associated with the constructive atmosphere at the helsinki summit, when putin and trump had at their meeting. he said the new restrictions were absolutely illegal and he said it was cutting off... —— but adorably unacceptable to link the sanctions to what happened in salisbury, repeating the moscow
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denial. he said russia could not have any connection to the use of chemical weapons. it seems that russia is rather confused at the moment. dmitry peskov talked about the unpredictability of our partners across the atlantic. he said you can expect anything right now from washington. no direct criticism of donald trump, and he also said vladimir putin was still hopeful for constructed relations with the united states. so, not giving up just yet on the trump administration. what can they realistically do, apart from a kangaroo noises about something like this? -- apart from make angry noises about something like this. earlier this week we saw rand paul visiting moscow and meeting russian officials and senators, handing in a letter from donald trump to the kremlin presidential administration, all of the talk then was about the importance of improving relations
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between washington and moscow. as $0011 between washington and moscow. as 50011 as between washington and moscow. as soon as you hear noises like this, something else comes round the corner, another obstacle to boosting ties between russia and the united states. it seems as if, to a large extent, donald trump's hands are tied. it was clear that he did not jump tied. it was clear that he did not jump at the chance of announcing these new sanctions. it seems he delayed these new sanctions. they should have kicked in quite a long time ago. but they didn't. he was cajoled and criticised by the house foreign affairs committee into taking this decision. of course, we haven't heard from donald trump. as i say, we have not heard the kremlin criticised donald trump. thank you very much. northamptonshire county councillors will be asked to approve drastic cuts to jobs and services, in an on—going emergency meeting that started earlier this morning. they're considering a plan to combat a £70 million budget shortfall. the council has already said it's likely to have to reduce services for vulnerable adults and children to a legal minimum —
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sparking a warning from the children's commissioner for england that it could have "catastrophic consequences". our correspondentjo black is in northampton for us now. too early for any results, but what was the result as it began? the meeting started about 30 minutes ago. quite a passionate start. a member of the public said the plans for cuts were shameful and a disgrace. she said she was going to start a disgrace. she said she was going to starta campaign disgrace. she said she was going to start a campaign to get people to stop paying their council tax because they are not getting anything for the money they handover. i also heard from the chief finance officer, who said the council cannot continue to spend money it hasn't got. he went on to say some previous actions were
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questionable, some were clearly wrong, but there have since been improvements in recent months. the cuts are coming quick and fast here. people have already noticed that subsidised bus routes have gone, 21 libraries are under threat of closure. that was going to take place next month, but it has been paused while a review takes place. the council opened a brand—new hq approximately a year or so ago. that has already been sold off to draw some money back. the road maintenance will be clawed back. the council leader now says it is inevitable that there will be cuts to children's and adult services. that is causing much concern. as i say, the meeting is over half an hour in, a0 minutes in, they will be looking at an action plan. the councillors will be voting on an action plan to reduce the costs at the council. whether we will get any
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specific detail once the meeting has concluded, we will wait to see. we don't know how long the meeting will be. it could end about one o'clock, but it could go on to two o'clock, 2.30, who knows. these discussions could be long and lengthy and might not be concluded today, they will go on for many months to come. what about the point you made about vulnerable children and adults, there is a line below which they cannot go in that specific field? yes, they recognise that. there is a core of they are exploring. i don't think anybody knows what the answer to that is, what is the core offer? the council said it is inevitable there will have to take money from these services, but they must be legally provided. that is why people are so concerned about what is going to happen in this county, in particular with relation to those services. many thanks, joe black in northampton. joining us in the studio now is councillor ian hudspeth, a spokesperson for the county councils' network and leader
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of oxfordshire county council. good morning. how does oxfordshire compete wait compare with both and ensure? it is not quite correct to compare ensure? it is not quite correct to co m pa re two ensure? it is not quite correct to compare two cancels. we have taken tough decisions in the past regarding services. actually increasing council tax as well, which meant we kept all a3 libraries open, working with volunteers. it's a different way of doing things, but it was important for the community so we have worked with them and kept the library is open. we make difficult decisions regarding subsidised bus routes and to school transport. it is getting back to a co re transport. it is getting back to a core service. this is about what our councils are legally obliged to put forward ? councils are legally obliged to put forward? it councils are legally obliged to put forward ? it is councils are legally obliged to put forward? it is very worrying for everybody. there is a funding gap for the councils in the county council network, to 2021. about a third of leaders are not confident that they can put forward a budget
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without significant funding coming from the spending review. one of the key things about all councils is that we have to produce a balanced budget. we cannot borrow for revenue funding in year. it makes decisions difficult. the decisions being taken by northamptonshire are difficult, they are tough. but actually, it is to make sure the core services are available for the vulnerable residents. you can't compare like with like directly, but there are issues here. how much do you think central government has failed to put its hand in its pocket sufficiently to stop this happening? since 2010 we have had a programme of reductions, a0% reduction in revenue support grant. that will be com pletely support grant. that will be completely eliminated by the end of 2020. councils have had to step up to the plate. at the same time we have had increased pressure on social services. it is great but we
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are living longer, but what that means is that more of us require that pressure, children's services, a lot of demand as well. at one stage we have the increase going on, the other end we a decrease in funding. plus the fact that county councils have historically been one of the poorest funded areas, compared to london boroughs. 62% less. in a london borough that is about £a81 per head of population. in county councils, about £180. it's really difficult for us financially and was still have to provide the services. i wonder how politically frustrating you find it? yours is a conservative council, so it's northamptonshire, we have a conservative government in power at the moment. what is going on within your party to allow something like this to happen? i don't think there is anything wrong in the party, the government had to make really difficult decisions, he will remember back in 2010 we have a budget deficit of somewhere around £175 billion a year. that has been
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brought down and the government has done a lot of work. they have taken tough decisions to bring that down but we are still borrowing £a0 billion a balanced budget. it is difficult. i had to make some decisions that i don't personally agree with. to balance the budget is the key thing. you haven't always had the chance to raise council tax because of what has been determined centrally. sometimes you have. that's not just centrally. sometimes you have. that's notjust you, but conservative councils more broadly. that allegation has been thrown in some directions, but when the opportunity has arisen, it has not been taken because conservative councillors have been so keen to trumpet the low council tax levels. fair point? i think that is a fair point. some councils haven't. when i became leader, i looked at it and i said, well, actually, ithink it became leader, i looked at it and i said, well, actually, i think it is important to raise council tax, to gradually increase it so we don't get into a situation similar to northamptonshire. by making small
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increases every year, you increase the base budget, you increase your overall tax take. that is one of the things that perhaps northamptonshire should have looked at in the past. but there are other councils as well. there is great pressure on everybody to reduce council tax and not put it up. however, when cost pressures continue to rise, it is a lwa ys pressures continue to rise, it is always difficult to balance the books. thank you for coming in. the metropolitan police commissioner says she believes the former foreign secretary, boris johnson's, newspaper article about muslim women who wear full face veils does not constitute a hate crime. cressida dick told the bbc‘s asian network said that while many people have found his comments offensive, he "did not commit a criminal offence". iam nota i am not a muslim woman. but he read newspapers? i read newspapers, i know there were a lot of conversations on your programme yesterday and many people have found this offensive. i also know that
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many other people believe strongly that, you know, in the whole of the article, what mrjohnson appears to have been attempting to do was to say that there should not be a ban, and that he was engaging in a legitimate debate. i have to think of this, actually, as a police officer. as a police officer, what do you make of the language that he used? well, i can tell you that some people have clearly found it offensive. i can also tell you that i spoke last night to my very experienced officers to deal with hate crime, and although we have not yet received any allegation of such a crime, i can tell you that my preliminary view, having spoken to them, is that what mrjohnson said would not reach the bar for a
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criminal offence. it not commit a criminal offence. it not commit a criminal offence. the headlines on bbc news... the us announces new sanctions against russia following its alleged role in the poisioning of a former spy and his daughter in salisbury northamptonshire county councillors get ready to vote on drastic cuts to jobs and services to combat a £70 million shortfall. and fears of a no—deal brexit — sees the pound falling further against the dollar to its lowest level in almost a year. the commonwealth champion katarina johnson—thompson has started in the heptathlon at the european championships in berlin. she lies fourth after the first discipline, the 100 metre hurdles. shejust she just cleared her first height in the highjump as she just cleared her first height in the high jump as well. the second test between england and india was due to start at 11, but it's raining at lord's. england are one up in the series and will give batsman ollie pope his first cap. it's transfer deadline
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day, the window shuts at 5 this afternoon , jose mourinho says he's not confident that manchester united will make any more signings lets talk more about the state of the pound. it has fallen further against the dollar following the tumble that saw its slip below 1.29 dollars for the first time in more than a year. why has this been happening? has been a long story, we have seen fluctuations over the past year or so. more recently we are seeing investors selling the pound because they want to protect themselves against exposure to what they consider could be a hard brexit. that is where the uncertainty lies. comments over the weekend from liam fox, and also from the governor of the bank of england, mark carney, suggesting that there isa mark carney, suggesting that there is a more, a big chance, that we're going to have a hard brexit,
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compared to some sort of trade deal. that has meant that investors are worried, and that is when you see them selling off the pound. unusually, we had an interest rate rise from the bank of england. that normally props up the pound sterling. for the first time, investors say, in nearly a decade, that failed to do anything to keep the market a little bit calmer. in short, they are worried about political uncertainty in regards to brexit, and they are basically hedging their bets. what is the impact of this? well, it could not have come at a worse time. this is the summer holidays. as you can see, things are looking a little bit slim... ithink things are looking a little bit slim... i think that is a technical glitch. but what i can tell you is that it glitch. but what i can tell you is thatitis glitch. but what i can tell you is that it is a rotten time of year to see the pound weakening for tourists. when you go to europe or the united states, you will get less bang for your buck. you will get less pounds for your euros and for your dollars. also, it is not all bad news. the weaker pound means
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more tourists will come to the country and spend their money, because it is cheaper. also, importers and exporters. exporters will find the weaker pound will benefit them. businesses that export to foreign countries will see the benefits. petrol prices have also been impacted by the pound. we have seen the cost of oil rising, and the pound weakening against the dollar, which oil is traded in. that has meant that petrol and diesel prices have also gone up. a bit of a mixed picture in terms of what the impact will be, or is, at the moment. but many investors are predicting that we could see these big fluctuations in the pound for a good few months to come. next time you are on, we will widen the figures on the screen. can you not make me skinnier and the pictures wider? that would make me happy. let's ta ke let's take you to some new footage
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that has just been aired in the court case that is going on in bristol relating to the affray charge denied by the england cricketer ben stokes. i'm going to keep quiet as we watch this. it has just been played in court. there is no sound on this footage. what this is is body cam footage, that was obviously filmed after the events we witnessed took place. as you can see, ben stokes sitting on the edge of a police vehicle. this has just been played. the edge of a police vehicle. this hasjust been played. there is no sound. anything you say may be given in evidence. excuse me, i'm not pressing charges. you may not be, somebody else might be. he hasn't done anything to me, it's fine. i have no problem with him. that's not the point. i haven't. i'm his friend. yeah, yeah. nothing at the
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moment. did you pull up? that footage was first played in court yesterday, during the trial ben stokes and two others, who all deny affray in that incident outside the bristol nightclub. phil mackey is there at bristol crown court. bring us there at bristol crown court. bring us up—to—date on what has happened today, or what may happen later. the reason we are watching that footage now, first of all, is that it was played yesterday in court and has just been released to the media. as you can see, it is momentsjust after ben stokes was arrested, after this brawl outside the mbargo nightclub in bristol in december last year. it is body camera footage from the arresting officer. she explained why he has arrested him, he said, i was trying to defend my
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friends over there, the two gay guys. the defence, which may start later today, we are expecting an expert of evidence will be given by the england cricketer himself, his defence is that he felt the gay couple that was walking on the street were being threatened by the other two co—defendants, and he went to their defence. we have heard this morning the final bit of prosecution evidence, that was the statement given by one of his co—defendants, ryan hale, an ex—military man, who talked about events in the club earlier in the evening. he said he had been groped by one of those gay men, but shrugged it off. he said they bumped into each other as they left the club, he said the gay man had grabbed his bottom, he had shaken it off, and there had been some banter. he said he saw the two men crossing the road towards him. ben stokes was with him, as was alex
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—— ryan hale. he said he woke up in hospital and had injuries around his face. he said he had some kind of compression. he described himself as a happy drunk, not an aggressive one, and his head at the time he had no idea that there were any england cricketers in the club, or even who ben stokes was. ryan hale was knocked out during a brawl by ben stokes, along with the other co—defendant, ryan ali. all three deny affray. there is an adjournment, and at some stage you would expect ben stokes to start giving evidence himself. the trial is expected to finish sometime next week. thanks for the update. the results of an independent investigation into historic child sex abuse at two roman catholic boarding schools during the 1960s, ‘70s and ‘80s, will be published today. the english benedictine monasteries at ampleforth in north yorkshire and downside in somerset have
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apologised for past failings. the report is based on evidence given at public hearings in december. our correspondent richard lister reports. good morning, everyone. over two months last year, the independent inquiry into child sexual abuse held hearings into historical abuse at two roman catholic schools. did you ever consider telling the police? i considered the possibility but, again, it was rumour. father leo chamberlain, the headmaster of ampleforth school in yorkshire during the 1990s, was a student there during the 1960s and ‘70s. that was a period when this man, father piers gra nt—ferris, was abusing boys in ampleforth's prep school. he was jailed for two years in 2006 after admitting 20 assaults. another monk from ampleforth, gregory carroll, on the right, was jailed in 2005 for offences against boys there. police say their enquiry exposed three other paedophiles at the school but they'd already died.
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the other school focused on by the inquiry is downside, near bath. six monks here either assaulted children or viewed abuse images between 1960 and the early 2000s. one was richard white, who was given a five—year sentence in 2012. both schools say comprehensive reforms have been put in place since the abuse scandals and safeguarding children in their care is paramount. but, today, the inquiry‘s chair, professor alexis jay, is expected to rebuke the roman catholic church for failing to tackle the problem years earlier. richard lister, bbc news. a nine—year—old girl has died after suffering serious head injuries in a rock fall in north yorkshire. part of a cliff collapsed onto the beach at seaton garth in staithes yesterday where it's thought the girl was on holiday. part of the beach remains cordoned off. a much fresher feel
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a much fresherfeel for a much fresher feel for all of us today, some sunshine around, and also some showers. across east anglia, central and southern england and south—east england we have some rain, which is not going anywhere fast. slowly clearing eastwards through the day. quite damp and wacky. further north and west, a good deal of sunshine, but some showers, particularly for the western isles of scotland. mainly dry for northern ireland, spells of sunshine. in the sunshine, 21 or 22 celsius, might get 16 where we keep the rain. that wayne will deliver good at rain will pull away. showers working their way through the west. temperatures between nine and 12 celsius. in clearer skies, we get down to four five. a fresher feeling tomorrow. spells of sunshine, but the showers will be getting going, pushing their way across on a brisk south—westerly breeze. could go further eastwards tomorrow than they
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have today. in the sunshine, 20 or 21 celsius, but always cooler in and near the showers. hello, good morning. this is bbc news. our latest headlines... russia has described new sanctions imposed on it by the us as "draconian". the state department said the kremlin violated international law by using a lethal nerve agent against former spy sergei skripal and his daughter. northamptonshire county council has begun a meeting where it is expected to approve drastic cuts to jobs and services. the council is facing a seventy—million pound budget shortfall. a report from an inquiry into child sexual abuse is expected to severely criticise two catholic boarding schools run by english benedictine monasteries. former pupils have described being abused during the 1960s, ‘70s and ‘80s. the met police commissioner has said she believes borisjohnson's burkha comments did not constitute a hate crime. cressida dick said many people found the remarks offensive, but others thought he was engaging in legitimate debate. and coming up...
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a row over visitors being charged to visit one of northern ireland's most famous natural wonders — the giant's causeway. time for the sports now. good morning. it is the eighth day of the championships. it is under way. she has cleared her first height in the highjump. it is taking place right now. 182. somewhere short of a personal best. it has put her in the lead. it is one of her strongest events. remember she won gold at the commonwealth games in april. you can follow all the action across the bbc. well a second test should be under way with england and india,
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but it is raining. it has to be very frustrating for 20—year—old ali pope. he is scheduled to win his very first cap. england, remember won their last five match series. the transfer window closes at 5:00pm this afternoon. a couple of deals have been done this morning. among them daniel is joining have been done this morning. among them daniel isjoining manchester city from their partner club melbourne city. he was the youngest player at the world cup. he was expected to join celtic home loan straightaway to help develop the season. josie mourinho had hoped to bring in two more players to the club, warning it would be a difficult season if he could not. the clock is ticking. speaking this morning. it looks as though he will have to make do with what he has got. i have no confidence. i am not confident. the market closes today. so, it is time at least for me, at
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least for me to stop thinking about the market because the market will be closed. so i will have to focus on the players i have. that was four years ago. he is joined second. he opened a few weeks ago. he feels his game is in good enough shape to challenge. itjust it just puts itjust puts a different spin in my ear from being what some people see as being disappointing to back on track. and another major. and going forward again. great britain's wheelchair rugby team have missed out on a place in the final of the world championships
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in sydney. they lost to the hosts australia by 59 points to 57, in an incredibly tight match. they have never made it to a major world final — they'll take on the united states tomorrow for bronze. wheelchair rugby lost its uk sport funding after failing to win a paralympic medal in rio but the sport was given some financial support to compete at these world championships. they at these world championships. are still on for a m: that's all the sport for now. at these world championships. i'll have more for you in the next hour. regular physical activity three to five times a week is the optimal amount for improving mental well—being according to research published in the medicaljournal the lancet. more than a million people took part in a study in the united states which found that all types of activity, including housework and mowing the lawn were found to be positive but overdoing things was counter—productive. our health reporter laura foster has more. (tx) has long been known that exercise
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keeps the body healthy. and now we are keeps the body healthy. and now we a re really keeps the body healthy. and now we are really beginning to learn about the effect it has on the mind. new research which surveyed more than 1 million people found that those who exercise said they suffered from poor mental health less often than those who did not. it is one of the reasons that people come to this running club. i feel really good. no matter how your day has been, if you push yourself, you will be happy that you did. exercises the best way to de—stress. that you did. exercises the best way to de-stress. it has helped me get over a lot of different things. strength of the impact is also linked to how much time exercising. the biggest production in poor mental health came when people exercised for beauty and a half an hour and exercised for beauty and a half an hourand an hourat exercised for beauty and a half an hour and an hour at a time. if you exercised for an hour and a half, you would still see in improvement, but it would be smaller. the survey suggests there can be such a thing
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as too much. being active for more than three hours a day was associated with worse mental health that not exercising at all. does being an active lead to poorer mental health? or does poor mental health means you're less likely to get active? at this point, experts cannot determine which. with me is hayleyjarvis, head of physical activity at the mental health charity mind. also i'm joined by roland oertel in edinburgh. he found exercise made such an improvement to his mental health that he was inspired to make a career of it — swapping his office job to become a personal trainer. welcome to both of you. your first thoughts on what this study is saying and how much it tallies or does not win some of your experiences. we welcome any research that links this. this is a significant study, 1.2m in people. it confirms and builds on similar information that we already know.
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the nhs guidelines say we should be active for hundred and 15 minutes a week. and we should do it in bite sized chunks. i think it is concert tonight confirming that. i think it is key that actually being active benefits us all. i think there are a few limitations. focuses particularly on protect —— depressing. depression. how does this have to do with bipolar, schizophrenia etc. we know that if he present with mild depression we know that exercise should be one of the first things that you are prescribed. there are some limitations in the fact that this is self reported. that is one of the challenges in the field around self reporting. i think there are some
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really interesting insights on team sports and overtraining. roland, what has been your experience? my experiences when i was falling into depression i had a young child in the household as well i had a career change. idid the household as well i had a career change. i did not like the career i chose. there was basically no way out. i had two options, go on medications, go to the tv and asked for medication or do a bit of exercise and try to run myself out of depression. that is actually what idid. i of depression. that is actually what i did. i found of depression. that is actually what i did. ifound it of depression. that is actually what i did. i found it was quite helpful to go out for ten or 15 minutes in the beginning. then i found the inner dialogue which i had in my mind to clear my mind and thoughts and all my worries, the muscular activity and running helped me to do this. as i said, you have made a
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career of it. i don't think you have that in mind when you went out the first time? not at all. i was always interested in sports and extracurricular activities and swimming and cycling and etc. however, when depression happen, i could not believe it. what i did was i started running, i continued running and then i thought because the sadness in me was growing, i might help other people. how typical, haley, is a story we've just heard? i think we have seen first—hand that this could be life—changing. we have a programme that has reached thousands of people with mental health problems to get active. building social networks, and getting confident, the ability to be resilient. it is not easy as he said, 70% of people tell us it is
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very ha rd to he said, 70% of people tell us it is very hard to get started in the first place. not wanting to leave the house. a lack of motivation and interest in things. it can be very difficult. that is why programmes that bring people together air really important. there is that lack of activity could lead to poor mental health or the inverse. we don't quite know. we do still need more research to understand the mechanics. will we know about endorphins and serotonin and sleeping better, buti endorphins and serotonin and sleeping better, but i think a lot of cause—and—effect need to be worked out. one other aspect of this is that you can actually do too much as well as too little. i wonder what your take is on that. i totally agree. i say the minimum is about a5 to 60 per day. in a week, maybe you could repeat five times and that will get you going. you can overdo it if you take a long distance
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activities like running and triathlon. however when you are in the sport itself, you can learn about recovery time and downtime. and it is a part of the sport as well. a5 minutes to 60 minutes five times a week are essential and probably the best practise. when you talk about a5 to 60 minutes some people watching might think that is a lot. what falls into your category of exercise or activity could not there is a warm—up phase to it. you need to warm up for the exercise. you need to get the heart pumping and the blood flowing. make sure that you start sweating and keep up the heart rate at quite a high level so the heart rate at quite a high level so that you are not too exhausted, but also not doing too little. obviously, extracurricular
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activities around the house mowing the lawn executive —— exacted. that is why people might do too little or too much. i think people will never fall into the mistake they will do too much. too little is clearly worse than too much. i think it is a real balance. find something you enjoy, going for walks, real balance. find something you enjoy, going forwalks, build it up. thank you both very much. thank you for coming in. another powerful earthquake has hit the indonesian island of lombok, causing more damage to the already devastated area. authorities say 230 people are now known to have died in sunday's earthquake. david campa nale reports. after a series of hundreds of tremors since sunday, now a major
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aftershock. it startled rescue workers who had been digging through rubble or trying to get aid to survivors of the early or larger quake. it left already traumatised residents terrified. in the devastating north of the island, buildings and walls already weakened have collapsed. eyewitnesses describe people running out into roads even as rocks tumble down from the hillsides. officials say the epicentre of the aftershock was on land and so there has been no risk ofa tsunami. land and so there has been no risk of a tsunami. this latest quake was also felt in bali at the international airport, people were filmed shouting and running for the exits down escalators and across the main hall. on lombok most people live in basic housing in small committees. tens of thousands are
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now sleeping out in the open air or in the ruins of their home. after this latest quake, announcements we re this latest quake, announcements were made by the authorities at the evacuation site urging people to remain calm or to stay inside tents or to find open space near buildings. a humanitarian crisis now looms on the island where thousands are in desperate need of clean water, food, medicine and shelter. emergency workers have been reaching more remote areas as they continue their rescue missions. according to their rescue missions. according to the red cross, they have come across some villages which are completely collapsed. the official death toll from sunday's quake is expected to continue to rise. with the mitigation agency describing a big increase in the past 2a hours. in a moment, we'll have all the business news, but first the headlines on bbc news... the us announces new sanctions
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against russia following its alleged role in the poisioning of a former spy and his daughter in salisbury. northamptonshire county councillors are warning that the books may not be balanced this year as they prepare to vote on a series of radical cuts to combat a £70 million shortfall. and fears of a no—deal brexit — sees the pound falling further against the dollar to its lowest level in almost a year. i'm maryam moshiri and here's your business news. uk rental prices could rise as much as 15% over the next five years. that's the warning from the royal institution of chartered surveyors, who say the lack of new rental properties could drive up prices. more on this in a moment. sterling has recovered very slightly against the dollar after big falls over the past 2a hours. the falls happened after the markets showed concern that a no brexit trade deal will be reached with the european union. yesterday, it dipped below 1.29
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against the dollar for the first time in almost a year. the united states says it will impose fresh sanctions on russia after determining it used nerve agent against a former russian double agent living in the uk. britain welcomed the move, which will see new financial sanctions take effect on or around 22nd august. the news sent the russian rouble to its lowest level since november 2016. and new york has become the first major us city to approve a cap on the number of cars available through ride hailing apps. it's also agreed to set minimum pay conditions for drivers. ride hailing apps uber and lyft have criticised the move as bad for consumers. a lack of new rental properties could lead to a sharpjump in rental prices over the next few years. according to the royal institution of chartered surveyors, rental prices may rise as much as 15% by 2023. they also predict that national rental prices are likely to rise around 2% nationally over
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the next 12 months. however, rics say placing an extra 3% on second home stamp duty has made buy—to—let investments less profitable. joining me now from our nottingham studio is kate faulkner, who's the managing director of designs on property. kate, thank you so much forjoining us. first of all talk me through what is happening in the market right now. why are things of difficult for renters? just abut the 1596 difficult for renters? just abut the 15% in contact context a little bit. this is an inflation rise. it is not skyrocketing, but any rises when incomes aren't going up with inflation or indeed benefits, there are many in the private sector who are many in the private sector who are renting on benefits, and that is are renting on benefits, and that is a major problem. we have a government that has decided on a
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policy of what i call robbing peter to pay paul. they want to reduce the number of landlords investing in properties so that more first—time buyers can get onto the market. i'm afraid that policy was never going to work. because in this country we have a rising population and we need more homes for people to own and rent privately and indeed more social homes. what is the answer? one of the answers is the government supporting the large billed to rent sector. there are some new fantastic brand—new rental properties. and what i want to see is some landlords to ta ke what i want to see is some landlords to take a big house that nobody wa nts to take a big house that nobody wants or can afford and turns it into six flats. maybe take another house in turn into boutique hotel rooms. i would like to see an incentive for them. actually these
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are great new home creators. there are great new home creators. there are different areas in the uk with different rents rising problems. absolutely, house prices have been able to move way beyond peoples wage rises. what we see with friends typically they can only move with the affordability of the area. london, east anglia, the southeast, thatis london, east anglia, the southeast, that is where people are paid the most and so they can pay the most rentals. and they have the shortest stock. there are lots of other parts of the country where rents have not increased at all even over the last five or ten years. there is a very, different pictures. it's important to understand what is happening in your local area. thank you very much. other news now for you. shares in card factory have fallen 8% after it said weak consumer spending and "extreme" weather had caused a fall in sales and would mean lower profits.
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the greeting cards company now expects profits to be between £89 million and £91 million this year, below analysts‘ expectations of £93.5 milion. the german sportswear giant adidas says it's finances have taken a big hit over its acquistion of us rival reebok in 2005. regulators weren't happy with the way the brand was valued, so adidas says it is amending its books by an amount in "mid—triple—digit million euro range". meanwhile, the world cup helped boost profits to about $686m in the three months to the end ofjune. and swedish furniture giant ikea has opened its first store in india in the southern city of hyderabad. with a growing middle class, india could be a big opportunity for the company, but it's also a market with many quirks. ikea's giant blue store sits on a 13—acre campus, by the side of a busy road, in hitec city. let's ta ke
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let's take a look briefly at the market. i want to show you what the currency is doing. the pound is recovering ever so slightly. the london market is not looking that good either. that's all from me. thank you very much indeed. an oscar may still be the film award to win — but the tv audiences for this cinematic showpiece have been dwindling. so the organisers are creating a new award to honour box office hits which don't always rate with the critics. olivia crellin reports. chances are if you're a movie lover you've seen or at least heard about one of these films in the last couple of months. avengers: infinity war from the marvel franchise and the latest instalment in the mission: impossible series, mission: impossible — fallout were box office hits, bringing in billions of dollars worldwide. but they're not usually the type of film to take home one of these — an oscar. that might be all set to change
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the academy awards announcing on wednesday a brand—new for popular movies. it might increase the chances of stars like chadwick boseman and lupita nyong'o who starred in this year's hit black panther, a film that broke several records, including the highest—grossing solo superhero film. but some are concerned it could keep so—called popularfilms, like get out, nominated for best picture this year, from winning in the more prestigious category. the change is a sign that the oscars are under pressure to increase their appeal. this year's ceremony was watched by a us television audience ofjust 26.5 million viewers, the smallest in the oscars' 90—year history. disney, which owns abc, which broadcasts the show here, and academy, they're all worried about people just drifting away from this telecast. part of wednesday's announcement included setting a limit
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to the annual televised ceremony ofjust three hours. oscars organisers plan to achieve this by placing some of the academy's 2a award hand outs during commercial breaks. the dramatic cliffs at giant's causeway in northern ireland are one ofjust four natural world heritage sites in britain. for centuries, the columns have inspired artists and poets, but now are at the centre of a row over whether tourists are being charged to see the stones. the national trust disputes claims that its signs surrounding the tourist hotspot are misleading. as emma vardy reports... this geological wonder attracted more than a million visitors last year. legend has it the causeway was once the domain of warring giants. today, it is the focus of a different battle. the site is managed by the national trust, although to walk down and see the giant's causeway is free. but some people believe the national trust signage
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is designed to make people think they have to pay. they are trying to mislead people into thinking that they have to go into the visitors' centre to see the giant's causeway. the giant's causeway is free. it belongs to the people of northern ireland. it's part of our heritage. there are no signs saying giant's causeway this way, which is through the tunnel behind me here, which is free. but there are plenty of signs here telling me to go through the visitors' centre, where at the moment you have to pay £11.50. signs to the visitors' centre emphasise the cost of guided tours. it is not immediately obvious where to go if you just want to take the public footpath, and it is small print like this that has got some people even more annoyed. this says access onto the giant's causeway stones is by permission of the national trust. we just came down here, but we wouldn't have known it was for free. it looks like you have to have a guided tour, and it was only because somebody in our party had been here before that we knew that we could just walk down here.
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i would have paid. we were told that we had to have tickets, and to be able to show the tickets when we came down, and it was worth it. you know, you're expecting to pay for it. the local council has become so concerned it has launched an investigation to determine whether parts in the area which are managed by the national trust can have their status changed. signage at the entrance to the giant's causeway tells the public that they are using these paths with the permission of the national trust. but it's in law that this path from the entrance to the giant's causeway to the stones is in fact an asserted public right of way, and investigation establishes that all of the past must be asserted as public rights of way. this signage must be removed. the national trust denies that the signs on the way down here are misleading. it says it has made sure that the public right of way is formally noted on the public register. despite some suspicions, the trust says there are no intentions to start charging for access to the giant's causeway in the future.
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we are all about access as a conservation charity, and currently we allow people to access the whole site anyway. we acknowledge, as i say, one public right of way, and we had it registered with the land registry at our own expense. so we are absolutely keen on people being able to access the site and use it forfree, if that's the way they choose to do so. if you want to walk down forfree, though, it is not well signposted, is it? i believe it is, and we've done what we can to make it as clear as possible. it's on our website. but if you want to come and experience the site, with the visitors' experience, that is the best way to do it, we would argue. you can get a guided tour and the audio tour if you want that. the national trust says the costs go to maintaining the site and other sites on the national trust. the council wants the signs made clearer, and is determined to fight for legal certainty, so that visitors can continue to walk in the footsteps of giants for free. time for the weather now.
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here's alina jenkins. hello there. some good spells of sunshine around today. particularly the further west you are. it has been a stunning morning here on the coast of northwest wales. more sunshine to come with a small chance ofa sunshine to come with a small chance of a shower. by contrast, across the central and southern east anglia, we've got cloud and outbreaks of rain. it is not going anywhere fast. if you are in this area here, that rain is only going to slowly push its weight towards the east. behind its weight towards the east. behind it are its weight towards the east. behind itarea its weight towards the east. behind it are a few showers vertically for the western isles of scotland. most will be away from the showers. in the sunshine come the temperatures will be 21 or 22. more like 15 or 16 underneath the rain. gentle winds for most. let's just zoom in and
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have a look at the rain which will still be falling in areas that has not had a lot of rain recently. it will slowly pull away into the north sea as we go through the first part of tonight. behind that a few showers, but many of them will fade before further showers come in from the west as we go towards dawn. they will be clearest book —— clearest skies. temperatures holding up between nine and 12 degrees. tomorrow, we are still underneath this atlantic influence. the area of low pressure has moved across to scandinavia. there will be some more showers coming in and there will be a fresher field to the end of the week. some showers piling in from the west in the morning and slowly filtering their way towards the east as the day goes on. in between there will be some spells of sunshine but the showers could merge and there could be a longer spell of rain. if you see rain today you will
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tomorrow. in the sunshine, 22 or 23 celsius. it is just going tomorrow. in the sunshine, 22 or 23 celsius. it isjust going up tomorrow. in the sunshine, 22 or 23 celsius. it is just going up and down with the temperature. another area of low pressure for the weekend. a bit of uncertainty as to its position. it looks like on saturday the wettest weather will be stretching from northern ireland down through wales into parts of southwest england, much of scotland having a reasonable day on saturday. but the rain will be going towards the east on sunday. as we go further south for wales, they will be some rain on saturday and maybe still lingering on sunday. the further east you are, you will stay dry. it will be warm and humid on sunday. goodbye. this is bbc news. these are the top stories developing at midday there's a guy over there, covered in blood. and i've been told you punched him. he was abusing my friends for being gay. that's what i'm being told that the moment. that is why i am arresting
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you. ican moment. that is why i am arresting you. i can only do one thing at a time. police body cam footage is released at the trial of ben stokes, as the court hears the cricketer could have killed one of the two men he knocked unconscious. in the next few minutes the defence will start their case, with ben stokes expected to give evidence today. an historic child sex abuse inquiry into two catholic boarding schools finds both were "secretive, evasive and suspicious" and there were many more cases than were brought before the courts sit—and—go angry scenes as northamptonshire county council is discussed drastic cuts to jobs and services. they are being urged to back the plans in an emergency meeting. the us announces new sanctions against russia following its alleged role in the poisioning of a former spy and his daughter in salisbury. and the giant's causeway in northern ireland is at the centre of a row over whether tourists are being wrongly
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charged to see the site welcome to bbc newsroom live. the england cricketer ben stokes is expected to give evidence in his trial at bristol crown court in the next hour. he is charged along with two other men with affray following a fight outside a nightclub in the city last year. all three deny the charges. earlier this morning, the police released bodycam footage from the officer who arrested ben stokes — the footage was shown in court yesterday. if you do not mention in question is... if you do not mention in question is. . . that's if you do not mention in question is... that's absolutely fine. i'm
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not pressing charges or anything. somebody else might be. he hasn't done anything to me. i'm not pressing charges against him. i'm his friend. i will sit in this car, absolutely no problem. i'm his friend. i will sit in this car, absolutely no problemlj i'm his friend. i will sit in this car, absolutely no problem. i will explain why you have been arrested. it is because there is a guy over there covered in blood, and i've been told that you've punched him. because he was... he was abusing my two friends for being gay. that is what it is at the moment. will there be social cameras around here or anything? there will be? stokes, first name benjamin? a little bit more? this one is ok? just
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generally. thank you. other two the lads gone? the two the guys, are they gone? what about the two the lads question of the gay guys —— what about the two other guys, the gay guys? is it all right if i get them a bit more lucent? on your right? just on my right. if you look at my right hand, it's a little bit more... i've had three operations on my hand. is not because of that, trust me. we are just checking the cctv, to see what has gone on. the footage was played in court
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yesterday and shown to the wider public today. our correspondent phil mackie is outside bristol crown court. there is still an adjournment inside. the case for the prosecution closed at around 11 o'clock this morning. it is a trial that began on monday. much of it has been based on phone footage, cctv footage, and the body camera footage, filmed by the arresting officer. you heard her explaining to the cricketer why he had been arrested and him saying he had been arrested and him saying he had punched the man on the floor, either ryan ali or ryan hale, because he knocked both of the co—defendants unconscious, because he said he was defending two gay men who he says were being abused by them. all three of them have been sitting in the dock, they all deny affray. the prosecution allege that ryan hale armed himself with a metal pole, and that ryan ali armed himself with a bottle. the other
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person you heard was alex hales, ben sto kes‘s person you heard was alex hales, ben stokes's england team—mate, he was also involved in a brawl, but has not been charged with affray. in fa ct, not been charged with affray. in fact, most of the england team had gone out to the mbargo nightclub in bristol after a one—day international which they had won against the west indies last year. the adjournment has been going on forjust over an hour. the next thing that should happen when the case resumes is that ben stokes should begin giving evidence on his own behalf. we will return to you when that evidence begins. huge cuts to jobs and services are expected to be approved by councillors who're meeting now in northamptonshire. they're considering a plan to combat a £70 million budget shortfall. it's already said it's likely to cut services for vulnerable adults and children to the minimum allowed under current legislation. britain has welcomed new us
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sanctions imposed on russia over the salisbury nerve agent attack on sergei and yulia skripal. the sanctions will come into effect on the 22nd of august — and the us state department says more sanctions will follow within 90 days if russia fails to give assurances it will no longer use chemical weapons. the kremlin has called the move "categorically unacceptable" and claims the sanctions are illegal under international law. our washington correspondent chris buckler reports an attack in the middle of england continues to have consequences for international relationships. and in imposing sanctions, america is making clear that it believes russia used the nerve agent novichok in an attempted assassination here on the streets of salisbury. in the aftermath of the poisoning of the former russian double agent, sergei skripal, and his daughter, yulia, the united states was one of many countries that did take action. it expelled dozens of russian
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diplomats from the us, including many from its embassy in washington. and since then, members of congress have been pushing for the state department to make a definitive statement that russia had broken international law by using a chemical or biological weapon. in making that determination, sanctions are being automatically imposed that will prevent the sale of some electronics and sensitive technologies to russia. that could put a strain on relationships at a time when donald trump appears to be trying to reach out to vladimir putin, particularly as a second wave of harsher sanctions will follow unless moscow gives reassurances that it won't use chemical weapons again and opens up some sites to inspectors within 90 days. the kremlin is likely to resist that. it continues to deny that it was involved in the attempted murder of sergei skripal and his daughter. however, the us isjust one of more than 20 countries who've taken formal action against russia, and the british government has
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welcomed what it called the strong international response. chris buckler, bbc news. i spoke earlier to our diplomatic correspondent jonathon marcus — he told us what this latest move shows us about the us — russia relationship. what is fascinating is that it shows you the tensions within us foreign policy. on the one hand, you have president trump trying to be friendly towards the russians. the summit, we still don't know precisely what happened in his one—on—one meeting with mr putin, his invitation to mr putin to meet him again. various overtures from senators close to mr trump, to the russians. on the other hand, you have congress's role in foreign policy. the sanctions that have come m, policy. the sanctions that have come in, that will be coming in in a few weeks' time, stem from legislation backin weeks' time, stem from legislation back in 1991. they have been used in the past against both syria and
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north korea. essentially, they require automatic sanctions once it is determined a country has used chemical weapons in various circumstances, then the sanctions come in. the first wave, as i say, will not have a huge impact because many of the technologies that are already covered by obama era sanctions are denied to the russians. coming down the line, the next phase, in 90 days, has much more draconian steps, potentially even things like cutting off access of russian civil aircraft to the united states and so on. so, it is a big issue. the russians are very annoyed. it poses huge problems for mr trump's efforts to pursue a kind of parallel, more friendly approach towards moscow. unsurprisingly, the british government has welcomed this? absolutely, i think britain was delighted by the fact that so many countries, so quickly, backed its view of what happened in salisbury. the british government
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presented the evidence to them. they obviously caught in the international inspectors to take their own samples and verify what their own samples and verify what the british were saying. very quickly, as you say, a number of countries expelled russian diplomats, including the united states, expelling 60. what is fascinating in a way, in a sense, the clock should have started at that point but the imposition of these new sanctions. it didn't. the administration has been rather tardy in implementing this. some congresspeople have suggested that they needed to back up their act and get moving. it's curious in a way. if they had enacted all of this in a timely fashion, it might well have overshadowed and perhaps even prevented the summit between the president and mr putin. the first round of all of this, it is less significant. what could be coming down the road in 90 days' time, much more important. we will continue discussions about
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sanctions in a moment. the former foreign secretary borisjohnson is to face investigation by an independent panel. this follows complaints that his comments about the burqa bridge the conservative party code of conduct. it is a conservative party independent panel, iam conservative party independent panel, i am told. jonathan blake has been following events and has just sat down. tell us what we know? very little... forgive me for interrupting, we did not hear the first few words, it was not your fault, it was ours. of course, the statement we had from the conservative party this morning says simply that the code of conduct practice process is strictly confidential. but beyond that, we do understand that a number of complaints have been received by the party, concerning what borisjohnson said in his column in the daily
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telegraph about the wearing of full face veils and burqas, they will be considered by an independent panel. that tells us that the party has received complaints. we don't know how many wahoo from, but they will be like that. there is a disciplinary process that will follow, which sets out in broad terms how members of the conservative party are expected to behave. that is overseen by conservative party officials. at the top of that will be the party chairman, brandon lewis. we also understand that the conservative party is clear that it has a responsibility to ensure all complaints are investigated without prejudice, and it is right that the processes confidential while it is ongoing. are also making clear that the party does oppose any restrictions on religious freedom, including banning any types of clothing. so, confirmation this
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morning that several complaints have been made to the conservative party, formally, about what boris johnson said. and those comments on the burqa, which caused some rich controversy burqa, which caused some rich co ntrove rsy over burqa, which caused some rich controversy over the past few days and which have seen criticism from various sections of the conservative party, including the prime minister, saying that he should apologise for what he said, still, no comment on the whole thing from borisjohnson himself. the theory is that he is not in the country at the moment? he is on holiday, we don't know exactly where he is, but he is not around to elaborate further on what he has said. friends of mrjohnson has said he has no intention of apologising or rowing back his comments, and what he said was about speaking up for a liberal democracy and maintaining free speech. it is worth reminding ourselves that the thrust of his column in the daily telegraph on monday was arguing against the
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banning of the burqa and full face veils, which was recently lamented in denmark. —— recently implemented in denmark. —— recently implemented in denmark. it was the language used, comparing muslim women to bank robbers and saying it was ridiculous that they dressed in that way and they looked like they were looking through a letterbox. baroness warsi, the first conservative muslim cabinet minister, writing in the guardian newspaper that his comments helped create a climate where there would be an increase in hate crime. there was continued criticism of mr johnson, but as i say, no word from him yet. the headlines on bbc news... the met police commissioner has said she believes borisjohnson's burkha comments did not constitute a hate crime. cressida dick said many people found the remarks offensive, but others thought he was engaging
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in legitimate debate. police body cam footage is released at the trial of ben stokes, as the court hears the cricketer could have killed one of the two men he knocked unconscious. an historic child sex abuse inquiry into two catholic boarding schools finds both were "secretive, evasive and suspicious" and there were many more cases than were brought before the courts the 8th day of competition at the multi—sport european championships is underway, and katarina johnson—thompson currently is leading the heptahlon after the hurdles and the highjump... the britain was fourth after the first event but responded in the hithump, its is one of her strongest events and she jumped a season's best of1 metre 91 centimetres.
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she's 51 points ahead of olympic champion nafi thiam, who jumped some 10 centimetres less than her personal best. the second test shoul be under way between england and india but it's raining at lord's and the forecast isn't good either. that will be especially frustrating for 20—year—old ollie pope, who is set win his first cap. he's in the side in place of dawid malan and will bat at four. england are 1—0 up in the series. the transfer window in england closes at five o'clock this afternoon, and as usual, there's lots of speculation floating around but a couple of deals have been done this morning — among them, 19 year old australian daniel arzani joining manchester city from their partner club melbourne city. he was the youngest player at the world cup and is expected to join scottish champions celtic on loan to aid his development. manchester united manager jose mourinho had hoped to bring in two more players, warning that it would be a difficult season if he couldn't, but the clock is ticking and speaking this morning, it looks as though he will have
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to make do with what he's got. iam not i am not confident. i am not confident and the market close is today, so it is time, at least for me, to stop thinking about the market, because the market will be closed. so i will have to focus on the players i have. great britain's wheelchair rugby team have missed out on a place in the final of the world championships in sydney. they lost to the hosts australia by 59 points to 57, in an incredibly tight match. they have never made it to a major world final — they'll take on the united states tomorrow for bronze. wheelchair rugby lost its uk sport funding after failing to win a paralympic medal in rio but the sport was given some financial support to compete at these world championships. that's all the sport for now, a reminder action from european championships and the open water swimming, we'll be back with a full
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round up at1.30. an inquiry into child abuse at two catholic private schools says the level of abuse was "considerably higher" than the number of cases currently being brought before the courts. in a report released in the last few minutes, the two schools — ampleforth in north yorkshire and downside in somerset — were criticised as being secretive, evasive and suspicious and that they seemed to believe that safeguarding children was less important than protecting the reputation of the church. joining me now with the details is our news correspondent lisa hampele. tell us a bit more about what this report says? well, it is based on three weeks of hearings that were held at the end of last year. they we re held at the end of last year. they were held into the two schools, one of them, ampleforth, was described at the hearing as a beguiling school, like a harry potter school,
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where the parents trusted everybody to look after the spiritual needs of their children. but what they didn't know was that the monks there, many of them, were abusing the children. the report says the appalling sexual abuse was inflicted over decades on children as young as seven at ampleforth, and 11 at downside. ten people have been convicted of sexual offences or have been cautioned over pornography. but they say the spent over the abuse is likely to be far higher than that, and the true scale considerably higher, and it is not reflected in the number of prosecutions. they found that the perpetrators did not hide their want and needs, that they should just be allowed to go down the corridors and the boys knew what was going on. they did not hide it. it was not secretive. it was included in the communal activities. monks at both
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institutions were very often secretive and evasive, and suspicious of anyone outside the english benedictine congregation. for decades they tried to avoid giving information that could have helped with these inquiries. they prioritised the monks over the boys, over the protection of children. downside in particular, they manoeuvred the monks away so that when the boys who knew them had left, they then brought them back again. they say the catholic church, this investigation, it concludes that the schools did no more than pay lip service to the catholic church's own report into abuse in 2001, the nolan report, and in fact they were hostile towards it, and they were hostile towards it, and they say that while steps had been taken, neither school they say that while steps had been ta ken, neither school has they say that while steps had been taken, neither school has formally established a comprehensive scheme of redress, and apart from during the inquiry that has not been an apology. thank you for the time
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being. more reaction to that later during the day. let's get more now on the crisis talks under way, as northamptonshire council looks to approve huge cuts to jobs and services. our correspondentjo black is in northampton for us now. any developments since we last spoke? a small development. so, let me tell you what a section 11a notices, it is something that was imposed on the council. in council speak, it basically tells the council will not balance its books. one of those, when it is imposed, it isa one of those, when it is imposed, it is a very serious matter. two have been imposed in northamptonshire in six months. that should give you an idea of how serious the situation is. the council has to save £70 million by march of next year and still protect the vulnerable people in this country. the section 1a0
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notice has been voted on by the council and accepted. i can tell you that the conservatives, the lib dems voted for that, and labour abstained, but that is just a formality, it is a vote that is happening now on an action plan about how they will save £70 million to get rid of that black hole. that is the vote that most people are interested in in this county. because cuts can already be seen around this county, subsidised bus routes have gone, road maintenance has been clawed back, 21 libraries are under threat of closure. that was due to take place next month. but there is a review on that at the moment. people still fear that they could go. the brand—new headquarters at the council, which opened over a year ago, they have been sold off already, so the council could claw back some money. the vote about how money will be saved is currently taking place. the council have already said it is inevitable that there will be cuts to services, children's services, adult services,
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and that is causing major concern in this county. thank you very much for the update, jo black in northampton. a nine—year—old girl has died after suffering serious head injuries in a rock fall in north yorkshire. part of a cliff collapsed onto the beach at seaton garth in staithes yesterday where it's thought the girl was on holiday. part of the beach remains cordoned off as caroline davies reports. ambulances and emergency helicopters called to a tragic incident. those out for a day at the beach can only watch as rescuers try to help. the emergency services were called yesterday around a:18pm after a section of the cliff fell here at seaton garth in north yorkshire. the falling rocks hit a nine—year old girl, causing her serious head injuries. despite the rescuers‘ efforts, she died here at the scene. it's shocked this holiday village. theyjust said there's been an incident on the beach and that's all we know.
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tragic thing to happen, isn't it, really? in a place like this, it's bad. the girl's thought to have been on holiday with herfamily. they‘ re being supported by specialist trained officers. at this time of year, this beach would be humming with people. now it's empty, closed by the police as the investigation into what happened here continues. caroline davies, bbc news. a powerful magnitude 5.9 earthquake has hit the indonesian island of lombok, causing more damage to the already devastated area. it comes following a shallow 6.9 quake on sunday which killed 230 people, according to the head of the provincial search and rescue agency on the island. the latest aftershock was just 10 kilometres deep, and left locals fleeing into the streets to escape collapsing buildings. with more, here's david campanale. after a series of hundreds of tremors since sunday, now a major aftershock.
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it startled rescue workers who had been digging through rubble or trying to get aid to survivors of the early or larger quake. it left already traumatised residents terrified. in the devastated north of the island, buildings and walls already weakened have collapsed. eyewitnesses describe people running out into roads even as rocks tumble down from the hillsides. officials say the epicentre of the aftershock was on land and so there has been no risk ofa tsunami. this latest quake was also felt in bali, at the international airport, people were filmed shouting and running for the exits down escalators and across the main hall. on lombok most people live in basic housing in small committees. tens of thousands are now sleeping out in the open air
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or in the ruins of their home. after this latest quake, announcements were made by the authorities at the evacuation site urging people to remain calm or to stay inside tents or to find open space near buildings. a humanitarian crisis now looms on the island where thousands are in desperate need of clean water, food, medicine and shelter. emergency workers have been reaching more remote areas as they continue their rescue missions. according to the red cross, they have come across some villages which have completely collapsed. the official death toll from sunday's quake is expected to continue to rise. with the disaster mitigation agency describing a big increase in the past 2a hours. now it's time for a
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look at the weather. well, it has all changed across the uk. we had a heatwavejust days well, it has all changed across the uk. we had a heatwave just days ago and now we are feeling much cooler weather as far south as london as well, where it has been so hot so far this summer. look at cloud across east anglia, central areas of the southeast as well. it has been raining on and off. a lot of cloud in the atlantic, heading our way. across other parts of the country, it is absolutely beautiful. eastern scotland, the lake district, yorkshire, wales, the south—west. the rain will eventually tear away from east anglia and the south—east. a nasty area of weather sweeping across low countries and into denmark overnight. some ferocious winds and heavy rain. we are in the wa ke winds and heavy rain. we are in the wake of that and we have cooler conditions, a nippy night on the way, single figures out of town
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centres. tomorrow we have a day of sunshine and occasional big clouds with one two showers. take a brolly just in case. in the sun it feels warm enough. in the showers and the shade, in the breeze, it will feel a bit on the cool side. a classic bag. —— mixed bag. good afternoon. ten for the latest headlines. there are two other guys who have gone. what about the two other lads? they have gone. body cameras footage of when the cricketer ben stokes was arrested. he is due to take the stand at his trial in bristol. the court heard that he could have killed one of the men he knocked
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unconscious during a fight. a historic child—abuse sex abuse is considerably higher than the number of cases brought before the courts. the schools are run by english benedictine monasteries. there are found to be evasive and suspicious. northamptonshire are meeting to discuss its £70 million shortfall. the council is expected to approve drastic cuts to jobs and services in an attempt to balance the books. the us has imposed new sanctions on russia as they found they violated international law after using a lethal nerve agent sent on the former spy. they have described the sanctions esther conine, russia. also people being charged to visit one of northern ireland's national wonders, the great causeways. the argentinian sunset senate has
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voted down to liberalize abortion. the issue has divided the country. katie watson reports. on one side of congress, celebration, on the other, . .. congress, celebration, on the other,... there was also anger after the vote as the two sites came face—to—face. just like in june when the lower house narrowly voted in favour of the bill. it was a long day in congress. translation: this law does not legislate or recommend that anyone have an abortion, the only thing it does is defend the right to choose. if there were no law, we would be contributing to doing so in a clandestine manner. the business of some clinics and some doctors to the unsafe sale would be extremely expensive
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abortion drug which we all know, the law makes it possible. unlike the lower house, it was much more opposition to the bill in the conservative senate religious group had stepped up their campaigning to make sure the bill did not become law. translation: yellow window and definitely want to tell the world or container is not in favour of abortion. we do not want abortion in our country because it brings destruction to all lives. it is not a solution to people who need help. we need —— they need us to be next to them, they need love and this bill does not give them that. this bill does not give them that. this bill gives him a death solution. while the politician deliberating, the campaigners shouted. throughout the campaigners shouted. throughout the debate they made sure their voices were heard. as the day went on. the weather worsened, but it did
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not stop people from being in the streets. the greens carved for obtaining —— protest wearers wanted to see if history could be made. those in blue determined it would not. most argentinians are pro-life and what another option for the mother. to think argentina is not ready to legalize abortion?|j mother. to think argentina is not ready to legalize abortion? i don't think civilisation is ready to legalize abortion. i think everyone has the right to life. there is another marathon session in congress there will be no changes in the login. campaigners say it is not the end of the road yet. for those who wa nted end of the road yet. for those who wanted abortion legalize hope ran out legal on. the streets emptied before the senators started voting, they knew the fight was over for now. we will come back next year. it
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is really important that nowadays people are kind of rooting for it. there is a big change for us. translation: we will continue going out and fighting for the rights of women. until we win we will not give up. it is a debate that most people will return to argentina's congress again. now developments at bristol crown court. let me bring you up to date. this is the trial of ben stokes alongside two others. three men are charged with a fray. brian hale's charges have been dropped. thejudges said you hale's charges have been dropped. the judges said you will be aware that the prophet —— you will be aware that the prosecution did not happen. thejudge aware that the prosecution did not happen. the judge is aware that the prosecution did not happen. thejudge is suggesting that the charges against ryan hale should be dropped and this is what he has
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said. one of thejobs i have is examining the evidence presented. i wa nt to examining the evidence presented. i want to address you, the jury, to look at the third defendant. as madison proceeded, it has become a couege madison proceeded, it has become a college that mr ryan hale's involvement is you cannot come to the conclusion that he was using unlawful violence. the judge says, and therefore, i have had to consider the position of his return with that piece of metal. it is quite detailed evidence he is referring to. having analysed the evidence, i have come to the conclusion that it is right that i should exercise my responsibility of directing you that there is no case to a nswer directing you that there is no case to answer against ryan hale. i have come to the conclusion that you could not find him guilty of a fray and he concludes, i'm directing, you
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must find him not guilty in the light of my evidence and the law in this case. that has just emerged in the last few moments courtesy of the judge. in that case. there is a photograph of ryan hale who has just had that case against him dropped. of course two other men are still there to answer charges. one of them is the england cricketer ben stokes and we are expecting him to take the stand to give evidence in his defence a little bit later. that is the latest. more on that and the next few moments note out. now to health matters. the number of people going into emergency units is quite high. many people said the heat wave was one factor but andy mac unit say this volume is normally the same in winter as in summer. welcome. what
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is your take on these figures? as you are saying the nhs is working harder than ever in record numbers —— with record numbers of people accessing a&e. they do say we have spikes in summer we had very hot weather, that has affected people especially elderly people. dehydration, feeling giddy, may be falling overboard. that will be a contributing factor to the extra workload. what of waiting times? because they featured here. there is a whole slew of statistics that the nhs published on thursdays. these stats referred tojune. we're not talking now, we're talking about month ago. a&e, yes, record workload, but also record numbers of people who are having to wait over four hours. record numbers of people
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going from a&e into hospital because they need further treatment. so emergency admissions. that is clearly having some pressure on those people who have nonemergency treatment, planted missions, for hip operations or whatever. we're seeing record waiting lists. over a.3 million. it means that one in 1a people in england are on the nhs waiting list at the moment. and this ata time waiting list at the moment. and this at a time when the government has talked about putting more money in your trying to get some of these waiting figures down and for a long time. how does this all square? the nhs -- excessive waiting lists are not inevitable. you only have to go back ten years and nearly 600,000 people were waiting over a year for an elective omission. the figures coming out today show that three and a half thousand. historically, it is low, but it is now going up rapidly.
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the government have talked about putting more money in from next year. how that money will be directed, there will be lots of calls on that. people would have cancer won it for cancer and so on. i suspect the public does care about waiting times and i think the government will have to respond. the other thing the public might observe is you normally assume, the problem doesn't go away in the summer, but in the winter it does not of much difference. there is virtually no difference. there is virtually no difference. traditionally there tends to be a rise in terms of a&e in attendance for a whole range of reasons. children are on holiday. they are doing things and may injure themselves. it has been compounded with hot weather. hospitals have been keeping their emergency beds that they opened in the winter open
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still to cope with the influx of patients. thank you. more than a million people took part ina more than a million people took part in a study in the united states which found that all types of activities were found to be positive. but overdoing things as counterproductive. health reporter laura foster has more. it has long been known that exercise keeps the body healthy. and now we're learning more about exercise on the mind. new research which surveyed more than a million people found that those who exercised had better mental health than those who did not. i feel really good.
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exercise in general is the best way for me to distress. it has help me get over a lot of depression. the strength of the impact is also linked to linked to how much time was spent exercising. the biggest reduction in poor mental health came when people exercised for between half an hour to an hour at a time. if you exercised for an hour and a half, you'd still see and improvement, but it would be smaller. but the survey suggests there can be such a thing as too much exercise. being active for more than three hours a day was associated with worse mental health than not exercising at all. but does being inactive lead to poorer mental health, or does poorer mental health mean you're less likely to get active? at this point, experts can't determine which one causes the other. i spoke earlier to hayley jarvis, head of physical activity at the mental health charity mind. we were also joined by roland oertel
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who found exercise made such an improvement to his mental health that he was inspired to make a career of it, swapping his office job to become a personal trainer. i asked them if they recognised the conclusions of the study. it isa it is a significant study. 1.2 million people and it confirms and builds on some information we already know. the nhs guidelines tell us we should be active for 150 minutes a week and we should know that into small bite size chunks. i think it is confirming that. it tells us that it builds resilience. however, i think there are a few limitations with this as well. the focus is on per mac depression and i think we would like to call for more research. how does it have to do with anxiety, schizophrenia etc. physical activity should be one of
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the things that is recommended by physicians for mild depression. many people have come forward and said this is what i have done and this is where the limitations are. that is correct. that is one of the challenges in research around self reporting. it is a significant study. it confirms and builds on and there are some really important insights on overtraining. what has been your experience here? my experiences when i was falling into depression, i had pregnant wife and a child in the household. i had a career change. i didn't like the career change. i didn't like the careerl career change. i didn't like the career i chose. there was basically no way out. i had two options, go on medications, get antidepressants or just to take up exercise and tried to run myself onto depression. and
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thatis to run myself onto depression. and that is what i did. i found it is quite helpful to grow for 15 or 20 minutes in the beginning. then the inner dialogue which i had in my mind, to clear my mind and to clear my thoughts and worries, the muscular activity and the running helped me to do this. and now, you have made a career of it. i don't think you had that in mind when you went out for the first run. not at all. i was always interested in sports and extracurricular activities. and swimming and cycling, etc. however, when depression hit, i could not believe it. what i did was, i started running, i continued running and then the fitness was growing, i thought i might help other people. haley, how typical is this story?|j
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haley, how typical is this story?” think we have seen first—hand that physical activity is life—changing. ability to cope and be more resilient is absolutely key. it is not easy as he said. when you experience mental health problems, 70% of people told us it is really ha rd to 70% of people told us it is really hard to get started in the first place. not wanting to leave the house... lack of motivation and interest in things. it can be very difficult that is why programmes where we bring people together are important. lack of activity could lead to poor mental health or it could be a symptom of it? because the effect is the big question in research. i think we still need more research. i think we still need more research to understand the mechanics. time for the headlines now here in bbc news. boris johnson
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time for the headlines now here in bbc news. borisjohnson is to be investigated by an independent panel following the complaints about the burger breached the conservative pa rty‘s burger breached the conservative party's code of conduct. historic sex abuse case into schools. there we re sex abuse case into schools. there were many more cases that were brought before the courts. police body can finish the mac footage is released at the trial of ben stokes as they hear how the cricketer could have killed one of the two man he knocked unconscious. there was there at that news in the last few moments that one of those three have had the charges dropped, ryan hale. let's return now to the drastic cuts to services being discussed by councillors in northamptonshire today. the public spending watchdog, the national audit office, is warning that other local authorities could soon follow suit. our reporter fiona lamdin has been to somerset where they're also facing some difficult choices. three different communities,
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all living in somerset, all desperately worried about potential cuts. we started the day with siobhan and herfour—year—old son, lorcan. he has dwarfism. somerset has been their home for the last 1a years, but they are so worried about the funding cuts, they have just moved to neighbouring dorset. i was worried about lorcan going to school, and the level of support that he was going to be able to get there. and i could see services down the pipeline were going to diminish, and i thought i can't take that risk. i'm going to have to move now, before it happens. just two miles from the park is county hall, where all these funding decisions are made. do you actually use it? of course i do. i believe i have a responsibility to lead, and i think that is what myjob is. they have projected an overspend of £12 million until the end of march next year. in somerset, we've got
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a number of problems, additional problems. a large number of retired people, older people. we've got a lot of children in our care, and getting older, with more complex needs. so we've got some real strains on our finances, and we don't doubt that at all. but somerset aren't alone. northamptonshire is the first to admit financial disaster, and it is estimated that one in ten larger authorities in england are draining their reserves. in the most recent year, something of the order of £1 billion was taken by councils out of their reserves. and of course, for a number of councils, they're just spending money that's in the bank, saved for a rainy day. they are having to use it, and you can only use it once. next stop on our somerset road trip, a pool which is used every month by over 2,000 residents, though it is shutting in two weeks' time. well, in 2011 i was diagnosed with secondary breast cancer in my spine and pelvis, and my quality of life
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was quite minimal. i couldn't walk far, i couldn't do much. since i started coming here, two years ago, and joined in the aquafit classes, it has just made such a difference. i walk here every day, and then i go to my swimming. and if this pool closes i won't be able to get here, because my mum doesn't drive. they are calling an emergency meeting tonight to mobilise the town. we would give our time, free time to help run it. we would do the painting, we would do the cleaning, we would do anything it takes to keep it going. and finally, through the gorge to cheddar, to meet those fighting to save their a0—year—old library. to hear the cheddar library might close, i'm just absolutely shocked, because it's almost like, you know, i pay taxes, and having a library is just one of the absolute must, as a parent. they are just one of 15 libraries under threat. in an age where there is no
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money, communities may be forced to find solutions, if they want to keep their services from closing. the dramatic cliffs at giant's causeway in northern ireland are one ofjust four natural world heritage sites in britain. for centuries, the columns have inspired artists and poets, but now are at the centre of a row over whether tourists are being charged to see the stones. the national trust disputes claims that its signs surrounding the tourist hotspot are misleading as emma vardy reports. this geological wonder attracted more than a million visitors last year. legend has it the causeway was once the domain of warring giants. today, it is the focus of a different battle. the site is managed by the national trust, although to walk down and see the giant's causeway is free. but some people believe the national trust signage is designed to make people think
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they have to pay. they are trying to mislead people into thinking that they have to go into the visitors' centre to see the giant's causeway. the giant's causeway is free. it belongs to the people of northern ireland. it's part of our heritage. there are no signs saying giant's causeway this way, which is through the tunnel behind me here, which is free. but there are plenty of signs here telling me to go through the visitors' centre, where at the moment you have to pay £11.50. signs to the visitors' centre emphasise the cost of guided tours. it is not immediately obvious where to go if you just want to take the public footpath, and it is small print like this that has got some people even more annoyed. this says access onto the giant's causeway stones is by permission of the national trust. we just came down here, but we wouldn't have known it was for free. it looks like you have to have a guided tour, and it was only because somebody in our party had been here before that we knew that we could just walk down here. i would have paid.
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we were told that we had to have tickets, and to be able to show the tickets when we came down, and it was worth it. you know, you're expecting to pay for it. the local council has become so concerned it has launched an investigation to determine whether parts in the area which are managed by the national trust can have their status changed. signage at the entrance to the giant's causeway tells the public that they are using these paths with the permission of the national trust. but it's in law that this path from the entrance to the giant's causeway to the stones is in fact an asserted public right of way, and investigation establishes that all of the past must be asserted as public rights of way. this signage must be removed. the national trust denies that the signs on the way down here are misleading. it says it has made sure that the public right of way is formally noted on the public register. despite some suspicions, the trust says there are no intentions to start charging for access to the giant's causeway in the future. we are all about access
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as a conservation charity, and currently we allow people to access the whole site anyway. we acknowledge, as i say, one public right of way, and we had it registered with the land registry at our own expense. so we are absolutely keen on people being able to access the site and use it forfree, if that's the way they choose to do so. if you want to walk down forfree, though, it is not well signposted, is it? i believe it is, and we've done what we can to make it as clear as possible. it's on our website. but if you want to come and experience the site, with the visitors' experience, that is the best way to do it, we would argue. you can get a guided tour and the audio tour if you want that. the national trust says the costs go to maintaining the site and other sites on the national trust. the council wants the signs made clearer, and is determined to fight for legal certainty, so that visitors can continue to walk in the footsteps of giants for free. an oscar may still be the film award to win but the tv audiences
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for this cinematic showpiece have been dwindling. so the organisers are creating a new award to honour box office hits which don't always rate with the critics. olivia crellin reports. chances are if you're a movie lover you've seen or at least heard about one of these films in the last couple of months. avengers: infinity war from the marvel franchise and the latest instalment in the mission: impossible series, mission: impossible — fallout were box office hits, bringing in billions of dollars worldwide. but they're not usually the type of film to take home one of these — an oscar. that might be all set to change the academy awards announcing on wednesday a brand—new for popular movies. it might increase the chances of stars like chadwick boseman and lupita nyong'o who starred in this year's hit black panther, a film that broke several records,
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including the highest—grossing solo superhero film. but some are concerned it could keep so—called popularfilms, like get out, nominated for best picture this year, from winning in the more prestigious category. the change is a sign that the oscars are under pressure to increase their appeal. this year's ceremony was watched by a us television audience ofjust 26.5 million viewers, the smallest in the oscars' 90—year history. disney, which owns abc, which broadcasts the show here, and academy, they're all worried about people just drifting away from this telecast. part of wednesday's announcement included setting a limit to the annual televised ceremony ofjust three hours. oscars organisers plan to achieve this by placing some of the academy's 2a award hand outs during commercial breaks. now ina
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now in a moment it will be time for that news. but first a look at the weather. well in the last few days, weather. well in the last few days, we really have seen some dramatic shifts in the weather patterns. from the heat wave in the south, to much cooler weather. and i think for many of us, it is a picture of sunshine and showers over the coming days. the atlantic is looking more active right now. we have even god tropical storm out there. weather systems brewing in the northern part of the ocean. i want to shave the jet stream. look at the dip. when we see dips, that means we are seeing colder air from dips, that means we are seeing colder airfrom the dips, that means we are seeing colder air from the polls. dips, that means we are seeing colder airfrom the polls. the heat that we had is now transferred to the east of us. this is what it looks like during the rush hour. a lot of fine weather around. it has been cloudy across the southeast.
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this is actually a nasty little area of low pressure that will be bringing some stormy conditions to parts of the low country. also into denmark may be through the night. u nfortu nately denmark may be through the night. unfortunately —— denmark may be through the night. u nfortu nately — — fortu nate denmark may be through the night. unfortunately —— fortunate that is missing us. it will be a chilly night. i think single figures out in rural spots. in london 11 or 12, which is really quite cool compared to the lows we've been getting so far. they have been mostly in the mid or high teens. let's have a look at the weather for friday. we are waking up to plenty of sunshine. there are some blots on the weather map. these are individual showers that will be moving through. if you are out for any lengthy amount of time, take an umbrella, there could be some dark clouds on the horizon. you might get a downpour. most the time on friday it will be bright. in the sunshine it will be warm. in august, the sun is very powerful.
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saturday and sunday, we are expecting a low pressure to come in from the ed —— from the atlantic. there will be some rain and not all the time are everywhere. if we look at saturday some of the cities are lots of cloud around. the temperatures are fairly cool. in the south, there will be a little bit of rain around as well. temperatures picking up inland. goodbye. a court hears that the england cricketer ben stokes could have killed someone, in a brawl outside a bristol nightclub. police bodycam footage of stokes after his arrest has been released. he's giving evidence now. charges have just been dropped against ryan hale, one of the other two defendants. we'll have the latest live from bristol crown court. also this lunchtime: the conservative party is looking into complaints about comments made by borisjohnson about muslim women who wear full—face veils. the us imposes new sanctions on russia, in the wake of the nerve
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agent attack on sergei and yulia skripal. a damning report says appalling sexual abuse took place for decades at two prestigious catholic private schools, on boys as young as seven. this is a very hard—hitting, very serious report that, as i say,
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